Menu
Crochet / Video Tutorials / Crochet Tutorials

How to Crochet the Solomon’s Knot Stitch

In this easy tutorial, learn how to crochet the Solomon’s Knot stitch (aka the Lover’s Knot, Hailstone Stitch and the Love Knot stitch.)

This Solomon’s Knot crochet stitch tutorial is part of a collaboration with Lion Brand Yarns. This post contains affiliate links.

The Solomon’s Knot stitch is a delicate-looking combination of chains and single crochet stitches. But don’t let the lacey fabric fool you, the Solomon’s Knot allows you to create sturdy crochet mesh stitches that maintain their shape. Because of this, it’s a perfect foundation for our free Harvest Market Tote Bag pattern. (Click here to pin the Harvest Market Tote so you can whip it up once you learn how to crochet the Solomon’s Knot stitch!)

This is a photo of a tan mesh crochet tote bag. It is showing off the Solomon crochet stitch. The farmer's market bag is holding fresh kale and flowers. It is hanging off of a worn, light blue door.

What Makes the Solomon’s Knot Stitch Sturdy?

Because each extended chain stitch is “locked” in place with a single crochet, you’ll find that the stitches can’t slip too far out of place. This gives the fabric an incredible capacity to bounce back into shape after being stretched out.

Pin it! Click to pin this tutorial for later ⇨

What should I crochet with the Solomon’s Knot stitch?

The lacey, open look of the Solomon’s Knot crochet stitch makes it perfect for lightweight shawls and scarves. Because the stitches are lean and minimal, it also makes fantastic fabric for anything that needs to pack up small, while being able to expand when necessary. The Harvest Market Tote Bag pattern is a good example.

Make it! Click to get the free Harvest Market Tote pattern ⇨

This is a photo of a women showing how a mesh crochet bag can expand from a tight ball. On the left side, she is holding the bag folded down to it's smallest size. On the right side, she is holding the bag fully open, showing the size of the bag as well as the solomon crochet stitch used to make the bag.

More Crochet Stitch Tutorials

How to Corner to Corner Crochet
How to Tunisian Crochet
How to Crochet a Hexagon

How To Crochet the Solomon’s Knot Stitch
Crochet Tutorial

Pin this tutorial for later here.

The Solomon’s Knot crochet stitch differs from other stitches in that you don’t begin with a foundation of exclusively chain stitches. Instead, Solomon’s Knot stitches are created from the get-go.

Scroll down for the photo tutorial to see exactly how to get started or watch the brief video below to learn some extra tips and tricks.

Solomon’s Knot Tips + Tricks (With Video)

Watch the 60 second video below to see the Solomon’s Knot stitch in action and learn some tips and tricks for crocheting it smoothly. (If you have an ad-blocker running, you’ll need to disable it to view the video.)

Solomon’s Knot Written Instructions (With Photos)

WRITTEN INSTRUCTIONS ABBREVIATIONS (US TERMS):
ch – chain
rep – repeat
RS – right side
sc – single crochet
sk – skip
st(s) – stitch(es)
WS – wrong side
SK – Solomon’s Knot: A lengthened chain stitch, locked in place with a single crochet stitch in the back loop of the chain.

WRITTEN INSTRUCTIONS:
Foundation Row: Ch 2, sc in second ch from the hook, make SK until desired length is achieved; turn. 

A detailed photo tutorial showing how to crochet the Solomon's Knot crochet stitch using Lion Brand 24/7 Cotton yarn.

Most Solomon’s Knot crochet patterns will tell you how high to pull your chain loops. In the Harvest Market Tote Bag, we pull them about a half an inch, which ends up being just enough space for your thumb to pinch and secure. As you practice the Lover’s Knot stitch, you’ll find it easier to keep your chain heights consistent, which will also improve the overall look of your stitches.

A detailed photo tutorial showing how to crochet the Solomon's Knot crochet stitch using Lion Brand 24/7 Cotton yarn.
A detailed photo tutorial showing how to crochet the Solomon's Knot crochet stitch using Lion Brand 24/7 Cotton yarn.
A detailed photo tutorial showing how to crochet the Solomon's Knot crochet stitch using Lion Brand 24/7 Cotton yarn.

WRITTEN INSTRUCTIONS:
Row 2: Sc in sc between 3rd and 4th loops from hook, *2 SK, skip 2 loops, sc in next sc; rep from * to end of row; turn.

Row 2 is where the Solomon’s Knot pattern will begin to develop. As with many crochet stitches, the Solomon’s Knot stitch requires a little bit of set up in Row 2 before you hit cruise control in Row 3 and beyond.

A detailed photo tutorial showing how to crochet the Solomon's Knot crochet stitch using Lion Brand 24/7 Cotton yarn.

The “half arch” pictured below is simply a result of the first arch needing to be cut short in order to keep the arches staggered in each row. This concept is only important at the beginning of each row.

A detailed photo tutorial showing how to crochet the Solomon's Knot crochet stitch using Lion Brand 24/7 Cotton yarn.

Note: Some methods of the Solomon’s Knot (SK) crochet stitch use a different chain height and three Solomon’s Knot stitches to begin a row. I find it simpler to begin every row by creating two Solomon’s Knot stitches at the same height as all my other SK stitches. This version is pictured below.

A detailed photo tutorial showing how to crochet the Solomon's Knot crochet stitch using Lion Brand 24/7 Cotton yarn.

Now each set of two Solomon’s Knot stitches are forming an arch above the anchoring single crochet from the previous row. The resulting effect looks like little diamond-shaped “windows” are being created.

WRITTEN INSTRUCTIONS:
Row 3: 2 SK, sc in sc between 3rd and 4th loops from the hook, *2 SK, skip 2 loops, sc in next sc; rep from * to end of row placing last sc in top of half arch; turn.

A detailed photo tutorial showing how to crochet the Solomon's Knot crochet stitch using Lion Brand 24/7 Cotton yarn.

WRITTEN INSTRUCTIONS:
Repeat Row 3 until desired height is achieved.

How Do I Count My Rows of the Solomon’s Knot Stitch?

It can seem a little tricky to count how many rows of stitches you’ve crocheted because at some point, they seem to merge together into a beautiful lace mosaic. I find that using my fingers to “walk” through the arches from the bottom of my piece to the top allows me to keep track of how many rows of arches I have stacked on top of each other.

Alternatively, pinning your work down to a blocking board can also help spread the mesh enough to count the number of rows.

A detailed photo tutorial showing how to crochet the Solomon's Knot crochet stitch using Lion Brand 24/7 Cotton yarn.

Should I block the Lover’s Knot crochet stitch?

Speaking of blocking, any mesh crochet stitch like this can benefit greatly by a little blocking. If some of your Solomon’s Knot loops are a little larger than others, blocking is a good way to smooth out inconsistencies–think of it like “organizing” your stitches!

To block your Lover’s Knot crochet project, use T-pins to pin it down to a blocking mat (or even a towel put down on top of your carpet), then aim steam from an iron or steamer at the yarn without actually touching the yarn. (This is important because too much heat can cause any synthetic component of your yarn to melt!)

Another option is to spritz water from a spray bottle on your yarn and let it dry overnight. In any case, it’s a good idea to check the fiber contents of your yarn before choosing a blocking method.

Want some company while you crochet?
Get support (and camaraderie!) in the Make & Do Crochet Crew Facebook Group here.

Share your work! Mention @MakeAndDoCrew and tag #MakeAndDoCrew to show off your stitches

Ready to Find Your Next Project?

Whether you’re into crochet sweaters, C2C crochet blankets, Tunisian or crocheting your own fedora hat, we’ve got you covered. You can find all our free crochet patterns here.

A grid of eight modern free crochet patterns from Make & Do Crew (Jess Coppom).

No Comments

    Leave a Reply

    This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.