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Basic Crochet Hexagon Pattern + Tips

Free pattern for a basic crochet hexagon. Super clear step-by-step photo tutorial. This pattern can be used to make any size hexagon for pillows, rugs, patchwork afghans or even clothes. | MakeAndDoCrew.com

Once you understand how this basic crochet hexagon pattern works, you can use it to make hexagon afghans, patchwork pillows, rugs, wallhangings or even clothes.

Basic crochet hexagon pattern. Super clear step-by-step photo tutorial. This pattern can be used to make any size hexagon for pillows, rugs, patchwork afghans or even clothes. | MakeAndDoCrew.com

Perhaps I was a bee in a past life because I love me some hexagons! I’ve used them in my crochet Happy Hexagons afghan, knit Beekeeper’s Quilt, in my popsicle stick hexagon shelf, on my teacher appreciation wine label and in my DIY honeycomb shelves. For me, hexagons walk the line between between totally classic, like honeycomb tile from the 1920’s, yet totally geometric and modern. 

Free pattern for a basic crochet hexagon. Super clear step-by-step photo tutorial. This pattern can be used to make any size hexagon for pillows, rugs, patchwork afghans or even clothes. | MakeAndDoCrew.com

When I first learned how to crochet a hexagon, I had some trouble understanding other tutorials did not spell out a few key details about the how each row should come together. I hope that by explaining the simple math behind this basic crochet hexagon pattern, you’ll understand exactly how to make a hexagon of any size. (And once you do, you can use this tutorial to learn how to sew them all together and even make a full blanket!)

Although there is technically a pattern you need to follow for the hexagon round increases, simply looking at what you did the last row will tell you what to do for your next row, so you won’t be super confused if you have to set your crocheting down mid-row to, say, clean up a massive flax seed spill by your 3-year-old.

Free pattern for a basic crochet hexagon. Super clear step-by-step photo tutorial. This pattern can be used to make any size hexagon for pillows, rugs, patchwork afghans or even clothes. | MakeAndDoCrew.com

And once you master this basic hexagon pattern, you can make a bunch and sew them into a patchwork afghan or even make more complicated color work motifs. I’ve always had a special place in my heart for big projects that require a lot of small repetitive pieces. There’s something really zen about figuring out the pattern and then setting your hands and your mind to cruise control while you crank out lots of the same thing. Hexagons are right up my mindless crocheting alley!

Here’s the Happy Hexagons afghan I made from all my hexagons! (You can get the free afghan pattern here.)

This free crochet afghan pattern is customizable, so you can use it to make a baby blanket, lap blanket or even a bedspread. Makes a great modern, gender-neutral baby shower gift idea or an afghan for the couch. Click for the free pattern and photo tutorial. | MakeAndDoCrew.com

CROCHET HEXAGON PATTERN

You can use any type of yarn to crochet a hexagon. Just check the label to see what size hook corresponds with the weight of your yarn. If you’re making something that needs to be a certain size, it’s a good idea to check your gauge with a sample hexagon before you make a bunch.

I’ve been loving these ergonomic crochet hooks lately (aff link). I don’t know how I lived so long without them!

Abbreviations (US terms)
ch – chain
dc – double crochet
sl st – slip stitch

Free pattern for a basic crochet hexagon. Super clear step-by-step photo tutorial. This pattern can be used to make any size hexagon for pillows, rugs, patchwork afghans or even clothes. | MakeAndDoCrew.com

Round 1: Begin with a magic ring. Ch 1 to secure the magic loop and then ch 2 more, dc in magic loop, ch 2, *2dc, ch2* 5 more times in magic loop. sl st to join last ch to the top of the first series of 3 ch. (Now you have 6 sets of 2dc +2 ch. The 2 dc will become the sides of your hex and the 2 ch gaps will become the corners.)

Free pattern for a basic crochet hexagon. Super clear step-by-step photo tutorial. This pattern can be used to make any size hexagon for pillows, rugs, patchwork afghans or even clothes. | MakeAndDoCrew.com

Round 2: ch 3, dc in next dc stitch, *[dc, ch 2, dc in chain gap from previous round], dc in next 2 dc* repeat 5 more times. dc, ch 2, dc in last corner gap. sl st to join last ch to the top of the first series of 3 ch. (Each hex side now has 4 dc stitches, separated by a 2 ch space.)

Free pattern for a basic crochet hexagon. Super clear step-by-step photo tutorial. This pattern can be used to make any size hexagon for pillows, rugs, patchwork afghans or even clothes. | MakeAndDoCrew.com
Free pattern for a basic crochet hexagon. Super clear step-by-step photo tutorial. This pattern can be used to make any size hexagon for pillows, rugs, patchwork afghans or even clothes. | MakeAndDoCrew.com

Round 3: ch 3, dc in next 2 dc, *[dc, ch 2, dc in chain gap from previous round], dc in next 4 dc* repeat 5 more times. dc, ch 2, dc in last corner gap. dc in remaining 1 dc. sl st to join last ch to the top of the first series of 3 ch. (Each hex side now has 6 dc stitches, separated by a 2 ch space.)

Free pattern for a basic crochet hexagon. Super clear step-by-step photo tutorial. This pattern can be used to make any size hexagon for pillows, rugs, patchwork afghans or even clothes. | MakeAndDoCrew.com
Step by step tutorial on how to crochet a hexagon. Lots of photos! This pattern can be used to make any size hexagon for pillows, rugs, patchwork afghans or even clothes. | MakeAndDoCrew.com

Round 4: ch 3, dc in next 3 dc, *[dc, ch 2, dc in chain gap from previous round], dc in next 6 dc* repeat 5 more times. dc, ch 2, dc in last corner gap. dc in remaining 2 dc. sl st to join last ch to the top of the first series of 3 ch. (Each hex side now has 8 dc stitches, separated by a 2 ch space.)

Round 5: ch 3, dc in next 4 dc, *[dc, ch 2, dc in chain gap from previous round], dc in next 8 dc* repeat 5 more times. dc, ch 2, dc in last corner gap. dc in remaining 3 dc. sl st to join last ch to the top of the first series of 3 ch. (Each hex side now has 10 dc stitches, separated by a 2 ch space.)

Free basic crochet hexagon pattern. Super clear step-by-step photo tutorial. This pattern can be used to make any size hexagon for pillows, rugs, patchwork afghans or even clothes. | MakeAndDoCrew.com

Crochet hexagon pattern notes

You can continue like this to make your hexagon as large as you’d like. As you see in this pattern, the hexagon increases by 2 stitches per side on each round.

Because the rounds will always begin in the same place in the middle of the hexagon side, each round you will have one additional dc to make in order to finish the round.

This tutorial explains how to join crochet hexagons with an invisible seam when you’re ready to sew them together.

Free pattern for a basic crochet hexagon. Super clear step-by-step photo tutorial. This pattern can be used to make any size hexagon for pillows, rugs, patchwork afghans or even clothes. | MakeAndDoCrew.com
Free pattern for a basic crochet hexagon. Super clear step-by-step photo tutorial. This pattern can be used to make any size hexagon for pillows, rugs, patchwork afghans or even clothes. | MakeAndDoCrew.com

Crocheted hexagons are the perfect portable project to stash in your purse. Start some today, even if you don’t know what they’ll become once they’re all grown up!

Free basic crochet hexagon pattern. Super clear step-by-step photo tutorial. This pattern can be used to make any size hexagon for pillows, rugs, patchwork afghans or even clothes. | MakeAndDoCrew.com

According to this typing system, I’m supposed to love round shapes, but I just can’t move away from my beloved hexagons. Do you have a favorite shape that appears and reappears in your crocheting or home decorating?

Free Crochet Patterns Made From Hexagons

Are you ready to take your crochet hexagon skills to the next level? Check out these beautiful free crochet patterns made from hexagons.

Free crochet patterns made from hexagons. Includes crochet sweaters, cardigans, and blankets.

1. Brunch Cardigan // 2. Grandmother’s Flower Garden Blanket // 3. Day Date Cardigan // 4. Campfire Cardigan // 5. XO Children’s Cardigan // 6. Happy Hexagon Blanket

WANT MORE FREE CROCHET PATTERNS?

I've got more free crochet goodness for you that'll knock your little handmade socks off.

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48 Comments

  • Jamie
    May 3, 2016 at 10:23 pm

    Thanks for the super clear instructions- it makes pattern-illiterate crafters like myself way less intimidated, and way more likely to attempt this. Just THINK of the amoeba rug I could create with hexagons…

    Reply
    • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
      May 5, 2016 at 3:27 pm

      Yes! Perhaps it’s time to mix geometry with biology to make a hexagon amoeba rug! šŸ™‚

      Reply
      • Karla
        September 26, 2017 at 8:39 am

        OMG! I’m so happy, cause I made it! Thank you so much for sharing.

        Reply
  • Cassandra Tylutki
    May 15, 2016 at 1:18 pm

    I’ve been searching the internet for the past 5 days trying to decide on a pattern that I want to do for a placemat. I love working in the round. I thought I had my mind made up this morning, until I came across your pattern. I am in love with the simplicity of your pattern. I can NOT wait to go buy some yarn and try this out

    Reply
    • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
      May 17, 2016 at 9:03 pm

      Haha, Cassandra, I fall into the internet rabbit hole looking for patterns too! Then I get so mad at myself for using all my crocheting time up scrolling through Pinterest šŸ™‚ Anyhow, I’m glad you found something that inspired you so you can get to making! I’d love to see the finished product if you’d like to tag me on Instagram (@makeanddocrew).

      Happy crocheting!

      Jess

      Reply
  • Crystal
    May 16, 2016 at 7:52 am

    I actually saw a pattern that called for hexagons to be sewn together to make a soccer ball. You get it by sewing 5 hexagons around 1, do this twice, then sew them together, leaving a small opening for your stuffing of choice (small trash bags, old paper, etc, or add some catnip in with the paper for the furry babies )

    Reply
    • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
      May 17, 2016 at 9:01 pm

      That’s a great use for hexagons! I guess that’s all a soccer ball really is–a bunch of hexagons, huh? I bet the furry babies would LOVE it! šŸ™‚

      Happy crocheting, Crystal!

      Jess

      Reply
  • Juliette
    May 24, 2016 at 9:59 am

    Hi! Thanks so much for this pattern. One point, in round 2 you say “DC in next 4 DC” when I think you mean in next 2 DC.

    Reply
    • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
      May 24, 2016 at 10:49 am

      Juliette–You’re totally right! Thank you so much for your hawk eyes! Sometimes I’m so crossed-eyed by the time I finish crocheting and editing a pattern that I make an error. I’m so appreciative of the observant readers who catch them. It’s corrected now.

      Thanks again and happy crocheting!

      Jess

      Reply
      • Juliette
        May 25, 2016 at 12:50 pm

        You’re welcome! It’s the least I can do when you’re teaching me how to knit hexagons. I’m just starting out as a Tech Editor, so it appears my training is working! šŸ™‚
        Juliette x

        Reply
  • Danyelle
    May 27, 2016 at 7:44 am

    Thanks a bunch for sharing this with all of us you actually know what you’re talking about! Bookmarked. Please also visit my site =). We could have a link exchange contract between us!

    Reply
  • Roseane
    May 28, 2016 at 10:03 am

    Muy hermoso

    Reply
  • Dianna
    May 29, 2016 at 5:21 am

    How would make a bread basket with hexagons?

    Reply
  • Erica Hartman
    June 2, 2016 at 7:30 am

    I bought 2 patterns for hexagon blankets on etsy and both were poorly written and quite frankly a waste of money. THANK YOU for posting the free, user-friendly version of a hexagon pattern that I’ve been searching for! I only wish I would’ve come across your post sooner.

    I’m wondering if you have any tips or techniques you like to use to connect the hexagons you’d be willing to share?

    Thank you again for sharing this wonderful pattern with the world!

    Reply
    • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
      June 11, 2016 at 9:05 pm

      Yay, Erica! I’m so glad you found what you needed. I totally agree. I had trouble finding a pattern that made much sense to me until I just sorted it out myself. I’m actually posting a tutorial on how I connected all my hexies very soon. I’ll link to it in this post so that you can find it and feel free to subscribe so you receive an update when it’s been posted. (I send digest updates about once a week or so.)

      Happy crocheting!

      jess

      Reply
  • Patricia
    June 8, 2016 at 5:02 am

    Hello, I’m English living in Spain and I only learnt to Crochet about a year ago over here. I found a pattern for a Hexagon puffed Cushion that is done in HDC but I keep getting it wrong! Could I use your pattern using HDC? Would it work, do you think? I’m using a cottony type yarn double and 6mm hook.

    Reply
    • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
      June 10, 2016 at 4:22 pm

      Hey Patricia,

      Hello from the USA! I believe that it would work fine. Give it a shot and see if it’s laying flat and seeming even after you try one. I’d love to know if it works for you.

      Happy crocheting!

      jess

      Reply
  • Leilani
    July 27, 2016 at 10:38 am

    Can you list the yarn and colors you used for the tutorial? I am loving them and your easy to read patterns!!

    Reply
  • Melodie
    August 21, 2016 at 8:25 am

    Thanks for the very clear, easy to follow instructions. I have made many afghas and believe I’ve seen some that you need a PHd to read. Thank you again.

    Reply
    • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
      August 23, 2016 at 11:51 pm

      Ha, I agree, Melodie. That’s why I wrote this tutorial. I was so confused by some of the others I found. I’m really glad you found it useful. šŸ™‚

      Reply
  • chrisitne tatum
    August 22, 2016 at 12:40 pm

    This is a great stash Buster. I have a stash of yarn that I have had for over a year-and-a-half didn’t know what to do with it now I know I’m going to hexagon my way through it thank you so much

    Reply
    • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
      August 23, 2016 at 11:44 pm

      These are perfect stash busters! And I love how portable little hexagons are.

      Happy hexagoning, Christine!

      Reply
  • Kate
    October 10, 2016 at 1:51 pm

    Any chance there is a video tutorial on the way??? I am a visual learner, and am struggling even with your super simple steps–other patterns are definitely not user friendly, like yours. šŸ™‚

    Reply
    • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
      October 16, 2016 at 9:10 pm

      Hey Kate,

      Thanks for asking. I wasn’t planning a hexagon video tutorial, but now that you mention it, I think it would be great to make one. I have several I’m working on right now, so it might be a little while, but if you’d like to subscribe I’ll def send a note out once it’s published.

      Happy crocheting!

      Jess

      Reply
  • Nadine
    October 16, 2016 at 6:48 pm

    Hey thank you so much for this pattern it looks awesome; I’m pretty new to crocheting (longtime knitter) but I’m wondering what a “magic loop” in your first step is? I’ve mastered double, single, chain and a few others but so far I don’t know that step. English isn’t my first language so it might be a translation issue. Thanks!

    Reply
    • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
      October 16, 2016 at 9:17 pm

      Hey Nadine,

      I didn’t know about the magic loop (or magic circle method) for a long time either, but it turns out that it’s a great way to start circular projects! Moogly has a really helpful video tutorial you can check out here.

      Happy crocheting!

      Jess

      Reply
  • Linnea
    October 26, 2016 at 8:23 pm

    Perhaps I’m missing it, but I couldn’t find anywhere that states how you prefer to finish off each hexagon, or how you hide the tails. I realize there are a variety of ways to do this, but I’d like to know how you do it for these. Thank you for this pattern, and for your time.

    Reply
  • Linnea
    October 27, 2016 at 10:21 pm

    First, thank you for this pattern. Second, I was hoping you could explain how you finish off the hexagons. I realize there are a variety of ways to do this, but I’d really like to know your preferred method. I’d like to stay as true as possible to the pattern. Thank you for your time!

    Reply
    • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
      October 28, 2016 at 5:04 pm

      Hey Linnea,

      You’re welcome! What are you planning to use the hexagons for? I have some thoughts on finishing them off depending on what you’re trying to make. I created this tutorial that describes how I sewed mine together. Another important thing to note is that I used a tapestry needle to weave the tail from the magic circle through the magic circle one more time (once I finished crocheting the hexagon). This helps ensure that the magic circle doesn’t come apart over time. Is there anything else you’d like to know? I’m happy to answer more questions if you’ve got them. šŸ™‚

      Jess

      Reply
  • Melanie
    November 15, 2016 at 10:36 am

    Would love to see a video of this done, I’ve never been able to follow written crochet directions well

    Reply
    • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
      November 19, 2016 at 12:01 am

      Thanks for letting me know! It sounds like a few people would like a video on this so I’ll try to add one after I get out from under this heap of holiday crocheting. šŸ˜‰

      Reply
      • Ruth Hamilton
        December 24, 2016 at 4:51 am

        Jess, I am having terrible trouble printing off this pattern, is it possible to make a printer-friendly page at all? Thank you for reading.

        Merry Christmas

        Reply
  • Winnie Nary Scothern
    December 22, 2016 at 1:07 pm

    Hi Jess, Thank you for the above step by step explaination of the hexagon patter.n, I’m going to give it a try. if you can email me when you do the video’s of the Hexagon and anything else you are doing I would be so grateful. I am a new crocheter and I’m eager to learn, tutorials are brilliant as I can’t always follow what the patterns mean.
    I’m just a pensioner and don’t have a website, but I always follow For the love of Crochet on Facebook, so I’m getting tips all the time. I am loving crocheting now. Thankyou.

    Winnie.

    Reply
  • Lynda Schold
    January 16, 2017 at 9:02 pm

    Why can’t i print these directions?

    Reply
  • Sharon Bobich
    January 24, 2017 at 6:42 pm

    how can I download or print the pattern?

    Reply
  • Callie
    April 11, 2017 at 1:40 pm

    Hi there! I bought all my supplies and came back here to view the video tutorial of how to crochet the basic hexagons. I could have sworn I watched the opening part of the video tutorial before but now I cannot find it. Has it been moved somewhere? Thank you for your time!

    Reply
    • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
      April 15, 2017 at 5:39 pm

      Hey Callie,

      I don’t actually have a video tutorial for hexagons yet, so maybe you watched someone else’s? You’re reminding me to make one though–so I’ll jump on that soon! šŸ™‚

      Jess

      Reply
  • Ryann Worley
    June 7, 2017 at 7:19 pm

    Hi Jess!

    Thank you SO much for your wonderful pattern! It’s the first hexagon one I’ve found that makes sense to me.

    I wanted to ask you if you had a recommended quantity of hexagons for a child size and adult size blanket. Obviously I can lay them out (as I have) but I was just curious on your input due to your experience!

    Thanks a bunch girl! ā¤ļøļø

    Reply
    • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
      June 18, 2017 at 3:14 pm

      Hey Ryann!

      Nice to hear from you! To make my Happy Hexagons baby afghan, I used 38 hexagons. It measures about 32ā€³x33ā€³. Perhaps with those guidelines you can estimate about how many you’d need for any size blanket you’d like to make. šŸ™‚

      Jess

      Reply
  • Michele
    July 22, 2017 at 7:59 pm

    Great pattern and very easy. Using some excess yarn to make geometric coasters. Fo you have a pentagom and star one. Also how could you do the corners without the ch 2. Thanks you were so helpful

    Reply
  • SIDNEY
    January 30, 2018 at 1:26 pm

    HI! Loving the hexagon pattern. How do you get your gap between the chain 3 and first dc so seamless?? I have a big gap that almost looks like another chain gap. Any help is appreciated!

    Reply
    • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
      February 5, 2018 at 10:07 pm

      I’d try to make the chains a bit tighter so that the total height is very similar to the height of the double crochets. Does that make sense? šŸ™‚

      Jess

      Reply
  • Natalie
    May 29, 2018 at 10:27 pm

    Thank you so much for this pattern. I used to think I couldn’t follow patterns because they never made sense to me. Then I found this one and all your patterns. Thank you!
    Going to make one giant hexagon as a blanket for my son (due in 3 months). Thank you!

    Reply
  • Katharine Robinson
    July 13, 2018 at 8:42 pm

    LOVE this pattern! It’s almost perfect for my blanket yarn! All I had to do was decrease from 2 ch to one in the corners! Looks great, works up easily and NO bulges or gaps! Thanks!

    Reply
    • Jess
      July 19, 2018 at 2:45 pm

      Awesome! Glad you enjoyed it!

      Reply
  • Anna Smith
    March 16, 2019 at 9:02 am

    Hi Jess,
    How are you feeling? I know you are ready to get this baby thing over with. Iā€™m praying for you and the baby. Question- in round one I did exactly what it said and I came up with 7-2dc ch2. It says to do 5 more times. Should it be 4 more instead? Thanks for the great pattern
    Anna

    Reply

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