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Video Tutorial: How to Crochet the Side Saddle Stitch

How to crochet the side saddle cluster stitch video tutorial.

The side saddle crochet stitch has a lovely, repetitive look that is both airy and substantial at the same time. Check out this video tutorial to learn how to do it step-by-step!

The sidesaddle cluster crochet stitch has a lovely, repetitive look that is both airy and substantial at the same time. Check out this video tutorial to learn how to do it step-by-step!I’ve been attempting to learn new interesting crochet stitches lately and this is one that is definitely worth taking the time to figure out. The side saddle crochet stitch is simply a combination of single crochets, double crochets and chains, yet it looks so unique. It has a beautiful, geometric pattern when viewed straight on, but the texture that appears from the side angle is what I really love.

The sidesaddle cluster crochet stitch has a lovely, repetitive look that is both airy and substantial at the same time. Check out this video tutorial to learn how to do it step-by-step!I will say that at first, the side saddle crochet stitch requires a bit of concentration. The repeat pattern is not quite as straightforward as the Suzette stitch or the moss stitch, but I explain the “logic” of the repetition in the video, so hopefully once you internalize that, you’ll be able to repeat it with no problem.

The side saddle crochet stitch has a lovely, repetitive look that is both airy and substantial at the same time. Check out this video tutorial to learn how to do it step-by-step!I originally found the side saddle stitch in the book “Basic Crochet Stitches*,” which has become a fantastic resource when I’m looking for just the right stitch for a project. I love it because it includes both written instructions and charts so you can reference whichever works for you. I show you a bit of the book in this tutorial video as well. (The book calls this stitch “sidesaddle cluster stitch”, but I’ve also seen people call it the “side saddle stitch.”)

The side saddle crochet stitch has a lovely, repetitive look that is both airy and substantial at the same time. Check out this video tutorial to learn how to do it step-by-step!The sidesaddle cluster crochet stitch has a lovely, repetitive look that is both airy and substantial at the same time. Check out this video tutorial to learn how to do it step-by-step!

Side Saddle Stitch Video Tutorial

Side Saddle Stitch Written Instructions

Abbreviations – US terms
ch – chain
sc – single crochet
dc – double crochet
sk – skip
dctog – double crochet together
cluster = dc4tog

This stitch is worked in multiples of 5 + 1 (add 1 more for base chain).

Row 1: sc in 2nd ch from the hook, *3 ch, dc4tog over next 4 ch, 1 ch, 1 sc into next ch; rep from * to end; turn.

Row 2: 5 ch, 1 sc into first cluster, *3 ch, dc4tog all into next ch 3 gap, 1 ch, 1 sc into next cluster; rep from * ending with 3 ch, dc4tog all into the ch 3 gap, 1 dc into last sc, sk turning chain; turn.

Row 3: 1 ch, sk 1 st, 1 sc into next cluster, *3 ch, dc4tog into next ch 3 gap, 1 ch, 1 sc into next cluster; rep from * ending last rep with 1 sc into turning chain; turn.

Repeat row 2 and 3.

How to crochet the side saddle cluster stitch video tutorial. Now that your hook is warmed up, you might enjoy learning these other stitches:Video Tutorial: how to crochet the moss stitch (also known as the linen, granite or woven stitch) How to Crochet the Moss Stitch

How to crochet the Suzette stitch video tutorialHow to Crochet the Suzette Stitch

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31 Comments

  • Joan Tisdell
    August 13, 2016 at 5:59 pm

    Thanks so much for an easy to follow informative tutorial! A pattern for a tee jumper for adults using this side saddle stitch and 4 ply yarn would finish things off nicely!

    Reply
    • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
      August 18, 2016 at 3:19 pm

      I agree! That’s a great idea, Joan. I’m happy your found the tutorial helpful!

      Reply
      • Joan Steuer
        April 7, 2017 at 8:39 pm

        Where can I find the video instructions for the side saddle please?

        Reply
        • Joan Steuer
          April 7, 2017 at 8:41 pm

          Where do I find the “moderation”?

          Reply
          • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
            April 7, 2017 at 9:19 pm

            Hey Joan!

            The video is above this comment area. The written instructions for the side saddle stitch can be found right below that. Is that what you’re asking about?

            🙂
            Jess

  • Jen Bruck
    August 15, 2016 at 5:39 pm

    So to make this into an afghan I am using multiples of 5 plus 1, correct? How many stitches did you do for your base chain for the example afghan?

    Thank you 🙂

    Reply
    • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
      August 19, 2016 at 10:04 pm

      Hey Jen,

      So you’ll want to do multiples of 5 + 1 and then + 1 more for the base chain. (So an example in the video is 15 + 1 + 1 = base chain.)

      My afghan (which is pretty small because it’s for my 3-year-old) is 122 stitches across for the base chain.

      Hope that is helpful!

      Jess

      Reply
      • Peck Barbara E
        May 7, 2017 at 5:53 pm

        Thanks for all the instructions. What kind of yarn and needle did you use? Love the color!!!

        Reply
        • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
          May 11, 2017 at 2:17 pm

          Hey Barbara,

          I used “I Love This Yarn” from Hobby Lobby for this tutorial. I think the hook was a size J, but I can’t quite remember. If you look at the label on the back of the yarn, you can see a suggested hook size and I’m pretty sure that’s what I used. 🙂

          Happy crocheting!

          Jess

          Reply
  • Elaine
    August 18, 2016 at 3:12 pm

    Why are the edges different on the side saddle stitch?,

    Reply
    • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
      August 18, 2016 at 3:13 pm

      Hey Elaine,

      That’s how the pattern has to work in order to be reversed on the next row. I explain more about it in the video 🙂

      Jess

      Reply
    • Cat
      January 24, 2017 at 10:59 am

      You need to chain 1 at the end of row two (just before the last DC)

      Reply
  • Tracey
    August 20, 2016 at 9:52 am

    Hi, what yarn are you using? I love the colour! How many skeins did you use for the blanket?

    Reply
    • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
      August 23, 2016 at 11:54 pm

      Hey Tracey,

      The yarn is “I Love This Yarn” from Hobby Lobby. I think the color is called light peach. I am actually doing a sampler blanket with different colors and stitches, so I’m not quite sure on the amount yet. I do love this yarn though because it’s really affordable, soft and easy to work with.

      Hope that helps!

      Jess

      Reply
  • Claire
    August 21, 2016 at 10:04 am

    Thank you so much for sharing these simple crochet stitches that look so beautiful,. I will certainly do both the Suzette stitch and the Side saddle stitch. I am really looking forward to my finish project to see how gorgeous it is to the non crocheter and to myself.

    Reply
    • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
      August 23, 2016 at 11:50 pm

      It’s my pleasure, Claire. Thank you for your kind words. It’s so fun to learn a new stitch isn’t it? I love how different crochet can look depending on the combo of stitches you use.

      Happy crocheting!

      Jess

      Reply
  • Selebgram
    September 1, 2016 at 8:19 pm

    Always loved it 🙂

    Reply
  • Gayle
    October 28, 2016 at 10:52 am

    I would like to make a blanket for a new baby. Can you help with how many base chain stitches

    Reply
    • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
      November 3, 2016 at 3:02 pm

      Hey Gayle,

      For this stitch, you’ll want to start with multiples of 5 stitches and then add 2 to that number. So it depends on the size you want and the thickness of your yarn, etc, but you can just chain any number of stitches that fit that criteria. (So like, 37, 52, 67, etc).

      Does that make sense?

      I’d love to see your blanket when you finish! I think this will be a lovely stitch for a baby.

      Reply
  • Deana
    January 4, 2017 at 1:20 pm

    My great grandmother made an adult size afghan for my mother with this stitch (I’ve been looking for it for YEARS) and I’m thinking of making her a new one for her birthday- do you have any idea how much yarn would be needed? I just really want to make sure I get enough- but don’t want to drown in extra.

    Reply
    • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
      January 18, 2017 at 8:53 pm

      Hmm. Well, how big would you want it to be? If you want a throw-sized afghan (as in, not a whole bedspread), I’d buy somewhere around 1500-2000 yards assuming you’re using worsted weight yarn. That’s just a rough guess. 🙂

      Reply
  • Kim
    January 7, 2017 at 2:44 pm

    Hello,

    Can you please tell me how I can get the book?

    Thanks much!!

    Reply
    • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
      January 18, 2017 at 9:13 pm

      You can purchase it right here: http://amzn.to/2iLCDrv That’s an affiliate link. Thanks for your support! 🙂

      Reply
      • Cindy
        May 7, 2017 at 12:29 pm

        Will it eventually be available in ebook format (particularly for Kindle)? Thank you!

        Reply
        • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
          May 11, 2017 at 2:19 pm

          Hmm. I hadn’t thought of that, Cindy. What would you like to have in an eBook format? Specific tutorials? Patterns? I’d love to know.

          Thanks for opening my eyes to a new possibility for how I could share my patterns and tutorials!

          Jess

          Reply
    • Fern
      January 21, 2017 at 11:25 am

      I’m also interested in throw size afghan – the link http://amzn.to/2iLCD brought me right back to this same page that i found the information in.
      For throw size: how many stiches to cast on,? and is there an appropriate edging when finished?

      Reply
      • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
        January 22, 2017 at 11:50 pm

        Hmm. That’s strange about the link. Does this one work for you? http://amzn.to/2jPjfxL

        So to make an afghan, you’ll want to have a multiple of 6 and then add 1 more for the foundation chain. If I were you, I’d chain a bunch of stitches until I had about the width I’d like the afghan to be and then just make sure you fine tune it to have a number of chains that is divisible by 6. Then add one more stitch for the foundation chain.

        Hope that is helpful!

        Jess

        PS. For edgings, I love to look on Pinterest for ideas. There are a ton of great tutorials!

        Reply
  • Cat
    January 24, 2017 at 10:57 am

    Loved this pattern. Thank you! Just a small note, I noticed a small error in the written pattern. On row two, the chain 1 just before the last DC at the end of row is missing.

    Reply
    • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
      January 26, 2017 at 12:42 am

      Thanks so much for pointing that out, Cat! I’ll correct the written pattern right now. I appreciate your eagle eyes!

      Reply
  • Phyllis Morelli-Baumach
    February 2, 2017 at 8:34 pm

    Do you think this would work with a multicolor yarn? I love this pattern , I used it for a white afghan. Thank you

    Reply
    • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
      February 8, 2017 at 10:54 pm

      Oh yes! I think it would be beautiful in a multicolor yarn. I bet it’ll be a totally different look than your white afghan. 🙂

      Reply

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