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Free Modern + Chunky Crochet Blanket Pattern

This chunky crochet afghan pattern is a perfect crochet baby gift idea, but the pattern also includes instructions for lap throw, crib blanket, bedspread and other sizes.

This chunky crochet blanket pattern makes a perfect timeless baby gift, but once you feel how soft it is, there’s no way you won’t want to make one for yourself too! The pattern explains how to make larger sizes and it works up super quickly in Bernat Blanket Yarn. Get the free pattern below or purchase the printable, ad-free PDF here.
  This chunky crochet blanket pattern makes a perfect timeless baby gift, but once you feel how soft it is, there's no way you won't want to make one for yourself too! The pattern explains how to make larger sizes and it works up super quickly in Bernat Blanket Yarn. This chunky crochet blanket pattern makes a perfect timeless baby gift, but once you feel how soft it is, there's no way you won't want to make one for yourself too! The pattern explains how to make larger sizes and it works up super quickly in Bernat Blanket Yarn.Okay, imagine this for a sec. Imagine you were able to pluck a few choice clouds out of the sky–the brightest, fluffiest, most day-dreamiest clouds–and then you used your perfectly old-fashioned, Laura-Ingells-Wilder-style yarn spinner to turn those fluffy balls of sky into long noodles of cloud yarn.

This chunky crochet afghan pattern is a perfect crochet baby gift idea, but the pattern also includes instructions for lap throw, crib blanket, bedspread and other sizes.Now imagine if you took that cloud yarn and crocheted a perfectly classic and modern (and easy!) blanket to create the most timeless and darn squishiest baby gift anyone has ever received in the history of time.

This chunky crochet blanket pattern makes a perfect timeless baby gift, but once you feel how soft it is, there's no way you won't want to make one for yourself too! The pattern explains how to make larger sizes and it works up super quickly in Bernat Blanket Yarn.Guys, this is what my sister did! Well, okay, the cloud spinning part was more like a Michael’s shopping trip, but either way, she made what is probably one of my favorite chunky crochet blankets ever. (And I kind of love all chunky crochet blanket.) 

If we’re Instagram friends, you might know that my sister, Mich, has gotten really into upping her crochet game recently and we’ve been collaborating on designing simple projects that build her skills, but don’t burn her out. Before busting out this beauty, she hadn’t crocheted much beyond basic beanies and scarves. THAT, my friends, is how simple this chunky crochet blanket pattern is to learn!

The-snow-drifter-chunky-crochet-afghan-pattern-freeWe decided to use the “Peephole Chevron” stitch for this project after trying many others. Bernat Blanket Yarn is quite bulky and more complicated stitch patterns were getting lost in all it’s fluffy goodness. I’m so glad we kept experimenting though because I adore how the subtle chevron pattern shines through in this chunky yarn. It’s a perfect blend of delicate, soft and gender-neutral, and the resulting blanket is practical enough to actually get used (and washed!) and used again by a new baby.

This chunky crochet blanket pattern makes a perfect timeless baby gift, but once you feel how soft it is, there's no way you won't want to make one for yourself too! The pattern explains how to make larger sizes and it works up super quickly in Bernat Blanket Yarn.If you have your heart set on a 30 feet x 30 feet version of “The Snow Drifter” afghan (me too!), don’t fret. Below I’ve included instructions for how to adjust the stitch counts to make any size blanket.

This chunky crochet blanket pattern is great for beginners and works up very quickly in Bernat Blanket yarn. Free pattern!Please do not publish or share this pattern as your own. You may make items to sell with this pattern. In exchange, please link back to MakeAndDoCrew.com/free-modern-chunky-crochet-blanket-pattern. Do NOT use my photos as your own sales photos. ­­View my policies hereNow go make something awesome!

“The Snow Drifter” Chunky Crochet Blanket Pattern

Purchase the ad-free, printable pdf of this pattern here.

Add this pattern to your Ravelry queue.

Finished Measurements: 35 x 46”
To adjust the size, see note below.

Supplies:
So you can spend more time crocheting and less time shopping, this pattern contains affiliate links at no extra cost to you.
Bernat Blanket Yarn – 2.5 skeins in Vintage White (approx. 650 yards)
• Tapestry needle
• Size N [9 mm] crochet hook          

Gauge:
10 st in pattern = 4”
4.5 rows = 4”
Gauge is not critical for this pattern.

Abbreviations:
dc – double crochet
ch – chain
sk – skip
st – stitch

Pattern Notes:

  • To increase or decrease the size of your afghan, begin with a chain that is a multiple of ten stitches (10, 20, 30…) and then add two stitches to that number to determine your foundation chain (12, 22, 32…) Each additional 10 chains you add will increase the width of the afghan by about 4”.

Foundation Row: ch 92.

Row 1: sk 2ch (counts as 1 dc), 1 dc in each of next 4 ch, *sk 2ch, 1 dc in each of next 4ch, 2 ch, 1 dc in each of next 4ch; repeat from * to last 6ch, sk 2 ch, 1 dc into each of next 3ch, 2 dc in last ch; turn.

Row 2: 3ch (counts as 1 dc), 1 dc into first st, 1 dc in each of next 3 sts, *sk 2 sts, 1 dc in each of next 3 sts, [1 dc, 2 ch, 1 dc] into 2ch sp, 1 dc into each of next 3 sts; rep from * to last 6 sts, sk 2 sts, 1 dc in each of next 3 sts, 2 dc in top of tch; turn.

Repeat Row 2 49 more times for a total of 50 rows.

Finishing:

Fasten off and weave in any remaining ends.

Strip down to your skivvies and roll yourself up like a burrito in your new crochet cloud tortilla. Cozy. Cozy. And more cozy.

If you like to crochet awesome handmade things for your home (who doesn’t!?), you might also like these patterns:

“Happy Hexagons” Free Crochet Afghan PatternThis free crochet afghan pattern is customizable, so you can use it to make a baby blanket, lap blanket or even a bedspread. Makes a great modern, gender-neutral baby shower gift idea or an afghan for the couch. Make from Hobby Lobby's "I Love This Cotton." Click for the free pattern and photo tutorial. | MakeAndDoCrew.com

Dollar Store Twine + Thrifted Belt Simple Basket – Free Pattern
Inexpensive utilitarian twine (from Dollar Tree!) and a thrifted leather belt combine to create a primitive, yet sophisticated home decor piece. This free crochet basket pattern is exceptionally easy to make with only single crochet stitches and can be customized to any size. Click for the free pattern and photo tutorial.

“I Heart You” Free Crochet Pillow Pattern
This free crochet pillow pattern with a modern heart makes a perfect DIY gift idea. Square cushion pattern includes written instructions, photo tutorial and a chart. | MakeAndDoCrew.com
And of course, AllFreeCrochet.com has plenty of fantastic chunky crochet blanket patterns if you run out of projects to make here!

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23 Comments

  • Vanessa O'Donovan
    October 29, 2016 at 7:48 am

    Thank you very much for sharing this pattern. I’ve recently picked up crochet and I have to admit I’m hooked! I’m going to have a go and make this! I love receiving your email, once again Thank you for this lovely pattern.

    Reply
    • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
      October 29, 2016 at 9:06 pm

      Welcome to the world of crochet, Vanessa! It’s it a wonderful hobby? I would love to see a pic if you decide to make this afghan!

      Reply
  • Gemma
    October 31, 2016 at 3:16 pm

    Thanks for the pattern. I’m in the UK, and am a bit confused when you say dc st. Here a double crochet stitch is equivalent to the single crochet stitch. But in your pattern, it says to skip two stitches which counts as a dc stitch, but I think the dc stitch (US) is equivalent to the UK treble crochet stitch, which requires skipping 3 stitches. Only the UK half treble stitch (US hdc) requires skipping two stitches. Can you clarify?

    Reply
    • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
      November 3, 2016 at 2:54 pm

      Hey Gemma,

      I too have gotten confused attempting UK patterns before! What that means is simply that the two chains are counting as the first double crochet stitch (you’d call it a treble crochet, I believe). So you are beginning in the third chain from the hook. In US terms, the double crochet stitch is usually equivalent to 2 chains.

      I hope that clarifies some things?!

      Reply
      • Gemma
        November 3, 2016 at 10:37 pm

        So when you do an US dc, do you yo twice or once?

        TIA

        Reply
        • Dina
          November 6, 2016 at 8:39 am

          for a US dc there is one initial yo before going into the next stitch then another one after coming out of the stitch that you pull through the first two loops (which becomes a 2nd loop on your hook) then a third yo that you pull through the last two stitches on your hook. I hope this helps.

          Reply
        • Ginny
          November 7, 2016 at 2:21 pm

          To make a US dc:
          Yo, insert your hook through the stitch and pull up a loop. You should have 3 loops on your hook. Yo and pull through 2 loops, leaving 2 loops on the hook, yo and pull through the last 2 loops.
          When you do a US triple you yo twice before inserting your hook through the stitch and pull up a loop. Then you yo once, pull through 2 loops, yo once and pull through 2 loops, yo nice and pull through the last 2 loops.
          Hope this helps!

          Reply
        • Sandy
          February 11, 2017 at 6:30 pm

          Once. In the US your treble is our double. Hope this helps!

          Reply
          • Gemma
            February 28, 2017 at 7:06 am

            Thanks.

            The UK treble has 2 yarn-overs, meaning there will be 4 loops on the hook (and usually requiring 3 chains in the turning chain). Our half-treble has 1 yarn-over, meaning there will be 3 loops on the hook (and usually requiring 2 chains in the turning chain). So in this pattern, I need to use a UK treble, it seems.

            Just a note for Jess, maybe it would help to have a quick conversion guide for your patterns because conversion from US to UK isn’t always simple due to the US having more than one terminology. I know there are conversion charts etc online, but they’re useless to me since a) I can convert in my head anyway and b) I don’t know which US terminology you’re using. I hope you’ll consider doing this to help us Brits out. 🙂

            To help you:

            UK
            Dc = no yarn-overs, only needs 1 chain in the turning chain;
            Htc (half-treble) = 1 yarn-over, needs 2 chains in the turning chain (except for circumstances where an extra chain is called for);
            Tr = 2 yarn-overs, needs 3 chains in the turning chain (except for circumstances where an extra chain is called for);
            Dtr = 3 yarn-overs, needs 4 chains in the turning chain (except for circumstances where an extra chain is called for).

            US (I only know of 2 different ways of naming each stitch)
            Sc = UK Dc
            Hdc = UK Htc
            Dc = UK Tr
            Tr = UK Dtr

            or

            Sc = UK Dc
            Dc = UK Htc
            Tr = UK Tr
            Dtr = UK Dtr.

            (If you look at what Ginny and Sandy wrote, even they don’t use the same US terminology either, further illustrating my point.)

            Cheers. 🙂

  • Apple
    November 14, 2016 at 2:27 pm

    Jess,

    Finally, a lovely pattern for which I can use the Bernat Blanket yarn I bought on impulse!

    One question: what is your tension like when you crochet?

    Thanks!

    Reply
    • Kelsey
      March 13, 2017 at 6:48 pm

      I think their tension is really tight. I normally crochet so tightly that I have to go up a hook size, but I stuck with the N and my gauge was way off for this pattern! 92 chains for me ended up being 45 inches long rather than 35, but I just went with it! It will just be a bit bigger blanket than anticipated 🙂

      Reply
      • sandz
        September 10, 2017 at 1:19 pm

        my super bulky (6) yarn with N yielded me 55 inches!

        Reply
  • Louann Prokop
    January 31, 2017 at 8:50 am

    I lovet blanket. But, haven’t crochet in a long time. I’m stuck already. 🙁 After the foundation row. I skip 2 chains. Then DC is there 5 DC before I I chain 2 skip 2?
    Thank you
    Louann Prokop

    Reply
  • Brittany O
    March 4, 2017 at 2:19 pm

    I’ve tried Row 1 several times now and cannot get it to work. At the end, I always have 7 left over instead of 6. Any ideas? I counted three times, I did do 92 I initially.

    Reply
  • Virginia
    March 29, 2017 at 6:47 pm

    I’m relatively new at crocheting and have started to work on this pattern, but I get stuck in the second row at this part: [1 dc, 2 ch, 1 dc] into 2ch sp. Can you explain what exactly that part means? Thanks!

    Reply
    • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
      April 3, 2017 at 10:42 am

      Hey Virginia,

      It means that you’re going to work a double crochet, then chain 2, then make another double crochet and all of those three things are going to happen in the same little space (2 ch space from the previous row). Does that make sense? It’s kind of a lot to squeeze in the space, but that’s what creates the peaks and valleys of the ripple pattern. 🙂

      Jess

      Reply
  • Tina
    May 8, 2017 at 8:42 pm

    Hi Jess,
    I’m new to crocheting and I’m trying to make this for my new daughter. Is there any way you can make a short video to demonstrate?
    If you can, it would help soooo much!
    Tina

    Reply
    • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
      May 11, 2017 at 2:15 pm

      Hey Tina,

      Welcome to the wonderful world of crochet! I’ll happily add that request to the list. 🙂

      In the meantime, this is a video tutorial of another pattern that is very similar that could get you started with the basic techniques you’ll need for this pattern.

      Happy crocheting!

      Jess

      Reply
  • Becki davis
    May 19, 2017 at 8:02 pm

    Hi. I’ve never seen the term “tch” before but I looked it up and now I know it’s the turning chain. However, I don’t see any tutorial that advises how to accomplish ‘2 D.C. In the top of the tch’. Can you please explain? Thanks.

    Reply
    • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
      May 24, 2017 at 4:33 pm

      Hey Becki,

      The 2 dc in the top of the tch simply means to work two double crochets into the space created by the turning chain. So you treat it like a normal stitch that you’re just putting two dc into.

      Hope that helps!

      Jess

      Reply
  • Alex
    July 2, 2017 at 11:28 pm

    Hi! I’m loving that you’re trying to answer all these troubleshooting questions!

    It’s been a long time since I crocheted so I’m a little out of practice, and I’ve never made this large of a project before. When starting the 3rd row, should you start from the beginning of the Row 2 step, or just start with the asterisk? I completely repeated the Row 2 step, but I seem to have a wonky little tail sticking out at my turn and wasn’t sure if it would pull back in as I continued on. Thanks so much in advance! I’m really excited to see how this will turn out.

    Reply
    • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
      July 16, 2017 at 3:16 pm

      Hey Alex,

      Welcome back to the wonderful world of crocheting! I’m sorry it’s taken me a while to respond. I hope maybe you got it figured out?

      You would want to start Row 3 with only the Row 3 instructions. So when Row 2 ends, you should be at the end of the row, then turn your crocheting around so that your hook is still in the same hand as the last round and begin fresh with Row 3.

      If you’re having trouble still, you could look on Youtube for a “crochet ripple afghan” video tutorial. While the pattern might differ a bit, you’ll be able to see the general idea of what I mean and then apply what you learn to this pattern. 🙂

      Jess

      Reply
  • Jessica tucker
    January 21, 2018 at 1:27 pm

    Hey I’m getting stuck on row 2. I got through the first dc ch 2 dc in the ch 2 space but then I’m stuck. It says go back to the asterisk but those stitches are not lining me up to get to the next ch space. Am I missing something?

    Reply

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