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The Campfire Cardigan Part 3 – Easy Crochet Sweater Pattern

In Part 3 of this easy crochet sweater pattern, we’ll cover how to add a cozy hood and a simple border to finish off your Campfire Cardigan. Check out Part 1 and Part 2 and if you prefer everything in one easy-to-print place, you can purchase the complete ad-free PDF of the pattern here.

So doable! This easy crochet sweater pattern is made using two granny stitch hexagons. Get the free pattern using Lion Brand New Basic 175 yarn from MakeAndDoCrew.com. This easy crochet hexagon sweater is part of a collaboration with Lion Brand Yarn. This post contains affiliate links.

Earlier this week I shared Part 1 and Part 2 of “The Campfire Cardigan.” Thank you all for such a kind response to this easy crochet sweater pattern! For any of you on the fence about tackling this project, I think you’ll see today that there really are no big scary secret parts of this patten that will leave you with a half-finished sweater in your closet for the next 12 years. This sweater really is a lot easier than it looks! (We can thank the hexagons for that! They truly work magic in this pattern!)

Crochet hexagon jacket--free pattern from Make and Do Crew using Lion Brand New Basic 175 yarn. In this easy crochet sweater pattern, learn how to crochet a hood.

For the final stretch of this easy crochet sweater pattern, we’re going to be adding a simple hood and then working a border around the entire sweater to tidy up all the edges.

Oh, and we’ll be weaving in ends. Yeah, there are sort of a lot of ends to weave in. Honestly, it really didn’t take me that long to wrangle my ends, but I know it’s never anyone’s favorite part of crocheting. Just put on a good TV show, get yourself some chocolate and bust ’em out like the pro weaver you are! You can do this.

Beautiful granny stitch easy crochet sweater pattern using Lion Brand New Basic 175 in Thyme, Camel, Cafe Au Lait and Juniper.

Thanks to Lion Brand Yarn for sponsoring this free crochet hexagon sweater pattern and enabling more free patterns on Make and Do Crew! Purchase a kit that includes all the yarn necessary to make your own Campfire Cardigan, plus a printed copy of the pattern here.

Please do not publish or share this pattern as your own. You may make items to sell with this pattern. In exchange, please link back to this post. Do NOT use my photos as your own sales photos. ­­You can read my policies hereNow let’s make something awesome!

“The Campfire Cardigan”
Easy Crochet Sweater Pattern
Part 3

Purchase the complete ad-free, printable PDF here on LoveCrafts.com or here on Etsy.

Add this pattern to your Ravelry favorites here.

Pin this pattern for later here.

Sizes: (Measurements when laying flat)
S/M: Length: 28.5”, Chest Width: 17.5”, Arm Length: 21”, but easily customized
M/L: Length: 30”, Chest Width: 20.5”, Arm Length: 22”, but easily customized
L/XL: Length: 30”, Chest Width: 23.5”, Arm Length: 22”, but easily customized
Sample pictured is a size S/M.

Supplies:
Purchase a kit with all the yarn necessary plus a printed copy of the pattern here!
• Lion Brand New Basic 175 (Weight: 4/medium – 175 yds, 3.5 oz)
– Color A: Café Au Lait – 3 (4, 4) balls
– Color B: Juniper – 1 (2, 2) balls
– Color C: Thyme – 2 (3, 3) balls
– Color D: Camel – 2 (3, 3) balls
• Tapestry needle
• Size L (8 mm) crochet hook
• Stitch markers or safety pins

Gauge:
• 3 granny clusters + 3 spaces = 4”, slightly less than 6 rows = 4” worked in double crochet granny pattern

Abbreviations and Glossary (US terms):
ch – chain
dc – double crochet
tch – turning chain
yo – yarn over
RS – right side
WS – wrong side
cluster – 3 dc stitches in same sp
rep – repeat
sp – space
ch1sp – the space created by chaining 1 in the previous row/round
ch3sp – the space created by chaining 3 in the previous row/round

View Part 1 of the pattern to make the hexagon base and seam the arm holes.
View Part 2 of the pattern to add sleeves and length at the bottom.

CARDIGAN HOOD

Notes:
• Hood is worked in a rectangle shape and then seamed at the end. (See photo above.)

• When working Row 1, back seam where hexagons meet counts as 1 granny cluster. (So work 3 dc into the ch1sp on either side of the seam, chaining 1 in between.)

• As done previously when switching colors at the end of a row, use the color of the upcoming row to complete the final yo of the row you’re finishing. Fasten off previous color. Proceed with new color in the next row. (See photo in Part 2 of pattern.)

All sizes:
With RS facing, attach Color D in sixth space from the back seam on the right side of sweater. Place marker in sixth space from the back seam on the left side of the sweater. (See photo below.) Left-handed crocheters: Attach yarn on left side of sweater and place marker on right side

In this easy crochet sweater pattern, learn how to crochet a hood.

Row 1: With Color D, ch 3, 2 dc in first sp, (3 dc, ch 1) in each sp until marked sp, 3 dc in marked sp; turn.(Switch to Color A in final dc as described above.) (12 clusters)

Row 2: With Color A, Ch 4, (3 dc, ch 1) in each sp until no spaces remain, end with 1 dc in tch; turn. (11 clusters)

Row 3: Using Color A, rep Row 1.

Row 4: Using Color A, rep Row 2. (Switch to Color D in final dc as described above.)

Row 5: (increase) Using Color D, ch 3, 2 dc in first sp, (3 dc, ch 1) in each of next 5 sps, 3 dc in middle dc of next cluster, ch 1, (3 dc, ch 1) in each of next 6 sps; turn. (Switch to Color C in final dc as described above.) (13 clusters)

Row 6: Using Color C, rep Row 2.

Row 7: Using Color C, rep Row 1.

Row 8: Using Color C, rep Row 2.

Row 9: (increase) Using Color C, ch 3, 2 dc in first sp, (3 dc, ch 1) in each of next 6 sps, 3 dc in middle dc of next cluster, ch 1, (3 dc, ch 1) in each of next 6 sps; turn. (Switch to Color D in final dc as described above.) (14 clusters)

Row 10: Using Color D, rep Row 2. (Switch to Color A in final dc as described above.)

Row 11: Using Color A, rep Row 1.

Row 12: Using Color A, rep Row 2. (Switch to Color D in final dc as described above.)

Row 13: (increase) Using Color D, ch 3, 2 dc in first sp, (3 dc, ch 1) in each of next 6 sps, 3 dc in middle dc of next cluster, ch 1, (3 dc, ch 1) in each of next 7 sps; turn. (Switch to Color A in final dc as described above.) (15 clusters)

Row 14: Using Color A, rep Row 2.

Row 15: Using Color A, rep Row 1.

Row 16: Using Color A, rep Row 2.

Row 17: (increase) Using Color A, ch 3, 2 dc in first sp, (3 dc, ch 1) in each of next 7 sps, 3 dc in middle dc of next cluster, ch 1, (3 dc, ch 1) in each of next 7 sps; turn. (Switch to Color D in final dc as described above.) (16 clusters)

Row 18: Using Color D, rep Row 2. (Switch to Color A in final dc as described above.)

Rows 19, 21, 23, 25: Using Color A, rep Row 1.

Rows 20, 22, 24: Using Color A, rep Row 2.

Fasten off.

SEAMING HOOD

Fold hood rectangle in half with RS facing out. Pin using safety pins or stitch markers. Using a tapestry needle and a doubled-over length of Color D, sew hood seam using the mattress stitch.

FINAL BORDER (the home stretch!)

Notes:
• One row of border granny stitch is worked around entire sweater (except sleeves). Hood receives two rows of border stitch.

Make sure all ends are woven into sweater.

Attach Color D at the bottom of hood on right side where the hood meets the shoulder. Left-handed crocheters: Attach Color D on left side of hood bottom and reverse all mentions of “right” and “left.”

Read through entire round before beginning:
Round 1: With Color D, ch 3, 2 dc in first sp, (3 dc, ch 1) in each sp around hood, down left front of sweater, across bottom of sweater, up the front right side of sweater, sl st to ch 3 from beginning of round to join; do not turn. Work extra (3 dc, c1) in bottom front corners of sweater. (See photo below.)

Round 1 cont: Ch 1, (3dc, ch 1) in next 24 sps, ending where hood meets shoulder on left side, sl st into next sp, 1 sl st into next dc to secure.

Fasten off.

Call your friends, sharpen your axe, grab your marshmallows and head out to build yourself a campfire!

How to crochet a granny stitch border around a sweater or afghan.

You may also enjoy these free crochet patterns from Make & Do Crew!

free modern crochet patterns from Make and Do Crew1. The Cocoon Cardigan – free crochet pattern and video tutorial

2. Faux Cabled Bun Beanie – free crochet hat pattern

3. The Logan House Wrap – free crochet shawl pattern

4. The Warm Welcome Blanket – free crochet baby blanket pattern

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37 Comments

  • Anne
    May 20, 2017 at 8:33 am

    Hi Jess. Thank you for sharing this beautiful pattern.
    I would like to make my sweater a little less holey. Can I achieve this by no chains between clusters and only ch2 in corners? How will this affect sizing?
    This willl be my first ever garment of any sort, so I want it to look extra special

    Thank you .

    Reply
  • Cindy Wood
    May 23, 2017 at 8:33 am

    Thank you. I will make this for my Mom.

    Reply
  • Sebesa Stohldrier
    June 13, 2017 at 4:43 am

    Hey Jess, I have a question: if you use an 8mm hook for a size large with weight 4 yarn, would you use a slightly larger hook, say an 8.5 or 9mm, with a weight 3 sport yarn? I’m new to crochet, I learned it to make slippers, since my feet are always cold. So I’ve been crocheting for, maybe, 2 months. I bought the sport yarn to make matching granny square slippers for the cardiac. I jest haven’t bought the cardiac hook yet, feeling I don’t have the right size. The only near size I have is n/15 10 mm. Thanks in Advan ce for the help, Sebesa

    Reply
    • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
      June 18, 2017 at 2:48 pm

      Hey Sebesa,

      Welcome to the wonderful world of crochet! If you yarn is slightly lighter than what I used, which is sounds like it is, I’d also decrease your hook size (so something smaller than a 8mm). You could look on the label of the yarn and usually there’s a hook size recommended. The pattern is written in a way that you can swap out a lighter yarn and then just add additional rounds to your hexagon to make it big enough for your body. You may like to add additional rows/rounds to the bottom of the sweater and the sleeves as well.

      Happy crocheting!

      jess

      Reply
  • Sebesa Stohldrier
    July 4, 2017 at 10:53 am

    Thx Jess! I’m still way back on the hexagons.. I’ll catch up someday. It took me a few tries but I finally caught on, and understand ‘row 3 has 3 motifs and it’s one of 6 side’s. I can finally see it and double check it. I started with the L hook, and it comes out kinda Lacy and tensioning is a bear. I’ll make the next he with a k hook, 6.5mm, and see if I like it better. So far it looks like an Afghan to me, and not to warm.

    Reply
  • Shirley
    July 6, 2017 at 3:55 pm

    This pattern was a bit hard in the bigining but I got the hang of it and I absolutely love this song muck and I just wanted to know where you by your yarn because I’m restocking on my yarn and I’m so excited about it I love all of York patterns could you please chek OTE my YouTube channel its Susie Susi

    Reply
    • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
      July 16, 2017 at 2:58 pm

      I’m so glad you’re enjoying it, Shirley. I get most of my yarn from LionBrand.com. They have pretty quick shipping and often put seasonal yarns on sale. 🙂

      I’d love to see your Youtube channel. Wanna leave me a link?

      Jess

      Reply
  • Chris
    July 9, 2017 at 11:51 am

    Started this straight from video, without even looking at pattern. Plan on making in different sizes for homeless children in area. Also hoping to make as Christmas presents! Wish me luck and fast crocheting

    Reply
    • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
      July 11, 2017 at 8:41 pm

      Wow, what an awesome use of your creativity! Everyone can use something made with that much love. I hope you enjoy the process!

      Jess

      Reply
  • Claire
    July 11, 2017 at 4:34 am

    Thanks so much for this pattern it’s great, I have customised it slightly by adding a few knitted rows of rib to the cuffs as I found they kept getting caught on things. Pockets on the front and a belt. I love it.

    Reply
    • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
      July 11, 2017 at 3:53 pm

      Oh that’s a great idea! And I love that you added pockets too. I wish I would have done that on mine. Maybe there will need to be a Campfire Cardigan sequel. 🙂

      Reply
  • Sandie Mumford
    July 18, 2017 at 3:35 am

    Thank you so much for these patterns. I’m gonna make one for me and one for each of my grown daughters.

    Reply
  • Kelly
    July 26, 2017 at 11:20 pm

    Is there a video for how to crochet the hood, and how to seam it correctly? I thought I seamed correctly but after finishing it wasnt, and I had to remove the seams (which is like sewing in ends…argh) thanks in advance! 🙂 Kelly

    Reply
    • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
      August 9, 2017 at 9:42 pm

      Hey Kelly,

      Oh yes! I hate removing seams! To seam the hood, you’re just taking the hood of the rectangle and folding it in half and sewing that one seam. So when worn, the seam just runs along the top of your head, from your face to the crown of your head. Does that make sense? 🙂

      Jess

      Reply
      • Hannah
        August 27, 2017 at 1:24 pm

        This explanation was really helpful for me! Thanks.

        Reply
  • Sharon Benson
    August 5, 2017 at 1:29 am

    hi jess
    great pattern
    im using a 6.5mm hook which is what my yarn recommends
    should i of used an 8mm as my hexagon feels quite thick
    would the 8mm make it looser thanks

    Reply
    • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
      August 9, 2017 at 9:29 pm

      Hey Sharon,

      I would suspect an 8mm would indeed make it looser. I actually had to use a hook size larger than I thought I would just to be able to achieve a good drape for my sweater. I don’t think much would be lost if you moved up sizes. 🙂

      Jess

      Reply
      • Sharon Benson
        August 15, 2017 at 11:44 pm

        thanks im now using an 8mm…it feels much better…also i did 14 rounds on hexagon then did a few extra rounds on the front and back panels…as the sleeves were getting big …just about to start lengthening the bottom and sleeves now.thanks again

        Reply
  • Stephanie
    August 9, 2017 at 1:18 pm

    Can this made without the hood? Or would it look weird?

    Reply
    • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
      August 9, 2017 at 9:11 pm

      It could totally be made without a hood! You could even just work a small collar if you wanted, although I don’t think it would need anything necessarily.

      Happy crocheting!

      Jess

      Reply
      • angie
        September 30, 2017 at 1:36 pm

        I was just going to ask the same question – about making this fab cardigan w/o the hood. I would like to know, thought, if you know if it would be much less yarn needed w/o making the hood? (If I’m ordering all my yarn at once.) TIA!! 🙂

        Reply
        • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
          October 6, 2017 at 2:58 pm

          Hey Angie,

          The hood doesn’t take up a significant amount of yarn of any one color, so I’m guessing you’d probably need the same number of skeins. I’m sorry I haven’t made it without the hood so I can’t give you exact yardage.

          Happy crocheting!

          Jess

          Reply
  • Irene Fournier
    August 11, 2017 at 6:43 am

    Basically started this pattern because I had alot of loose pieces of yard from other projects and thought it would be a good chance to use them up. I have had lots of wonderful compliments on it as I used alot of pinks and red with a silver thread. Am starting another one with greens and blues because I find I can make this to measure with not too much bother. Thanks for the input from everyone as I feel I will probably add some pockets on this one. The last one I didn’t sew the hood together so makes an awesome huge collar.

    Reply
  • Kayla
    August 22, 2017 at 12:24 pm

    I’m having some trouble with knowing where to stop the seam when sewing up the top of the arms. do I come right across and sew to the top of the back seam? does this make sense?

    Reply
    • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
      August 22, 2017 at 9:52 pm

      Yup, that’s exactly what you do. Just seam those top shoulder seams all the way. 🙂

      Jess

      Reply
  • G French
    August 30, 2017 at 11:30 am

    Can I ask a silly question. When you seam the tops of the arms, do you seam all the way along or just so far to leave room for the neck? I’m fairly new to crochet and simple things like this, throw us xx

    Reply
  • Sighing crocheter
    September 13, 2017 at 11:44 pm

    Looks a lot like this pattern from years ago, doesn’t it? http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/hexagonal-hooded-cardigan-2

    Reply
    • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
      October 6, 2017 at 3:12 pm

      Hey “Sighing Crocheter,”

      In the first part of this pattern, I link to the original sweater than inspired my pattern, which is not Celeste’s version, but yes, they do look similar. Just like Celeste’s looks similar to this one or this one. If you google “crochet hexagon sweater,” you’re likely to find many creative crocheters who have interpreted the basic construction of a hexagon jacket, just like I did.

      Jess

      Reply
  • Brenda Grove
    September 25, 2017 at 4:33 am

    I love this pattern its my first time doing anything but blankets I had so much fun making it thank you for the free pattern

    Reply
  • 4dognite
    December 5, 2017 at 12:28 pm

    Hi Jess- To make this cardigan in one color, will I still need 12 balls of yarn for a size large? Love this pattern, very clever! Thx!

    Reply
  • June Hockison
    March 24, 2018 at 11:55 am

    I’m confused. If I seam the top of the sleeves all the way to the center, that leaves no room for the hood.

    Reply
    • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
      March 24, 2018 at 9:43 pm

      The hood is worked in stitches picked up down the front of the sweater and along the back. 🙂

      Reply

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