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Morning Mittens: Free Crochet Mitten Pattern

This free crochet mitten pattern uses cozy wool and a knit-looking stitch to create a timeless mitten style that's great for personalizing and gift giving. This free pattern from Make & Do Crew features Lion Brand Fishermen's Wool in the color "natural."

This free crochet mitten pattern uses cozy wool and a knit-looking stitch to create a timeless mitten style that’s great for personalizing and gift giving. Get the full free pattern below or purchase the ad-free, printable PDF here.

This is crochet?! This free crochet mitten pattern uses the waistcoat stitch (aka the center single crochet stitch) to create a classic knit look. And the Lion Brand Fishermen's Wool makes them naturally water resistant! Get the free Morning Mittens pattern from Make & Do Crew.Thanks to my friends at Lion Brand yarn for sponsoring this free crochet mittens pattern and enabling more free patterns on Make & Do Crew! This post contains affiliate links. 

UPDATE: After you learn how to make this free crochet mitten pattern, check out my video tutorial on using food coloring to dip dye them here. It’s magical!

SECOND UPDATE: I’ve create a video tutorial with simple tips on working the Knit (Waistcoat) stitch used in this mitten pattern. You can find that tutorial here.

Did anyone else grow up wearing knit wool mittens? My mom would make my sisters and me each a pair (usually out of much finer yarn that I’m often willing to deal with ;)) and tie them together with a braid that would hold them securely in our coat sleeves all winter. Even as a kid, I knew that something handmade held a pretty special value.

Free crochet mitten pattern using 100% wool. These make a perfect crochet gift idea!

It was this memory of classic wool mittens that I had in mind when when designing this free crochet mitten pattern. And while I’ve seen a lot of people using the Waistcoat crochet stitch lately to achieve a knit-look with crochet, I’ve n…e…v…e…r been able to get it to work for me before. It’s always been too tight and wonky-looking and I’ve given up on at least four occasions this year. This time, I was determined to make it work because I knew it was pretty much the only way I could make “knit” mittens with crochet.

How to add leather accents on crochet projects, including these crochet wool mittens.

Serendipitously, I came across Sweet Everyly B’s tutorial on the Waistcoat stitch (also called the center single crochet stitch) and it really helped confirm a few things about this stitch that I suspected to be true:

– You have to crochet loosely. Like seriously loosely. I sized up my hook like three times before finding the right gauge.
– When you’re working your single crochet stitches, it’s helpful to stretch the yarn you pick up in the middle of the stitch (so the second loop on your hook) up a little more than you usually would in order to create a looser gap between the two posts of your stitch. (I included a photo of this in the free crochet mittens pattern below.)

This is crochet?! This free crochet mitten pattern uses the waistcoat stitch (aka the center single crochet stitch) to create a classic knit look. And the Lion Brand Fishermen's Wool makes them naturally water resistant! Get the free Morning Mittens pattern from Make & Do Crew.

Sweet Everly B has some really cute crochet patterns using the waistcoat stitch that you should check out if you like crochet that looks like knitting. And while I was adding my free crochet mitten pattern to Ravelry, I came across Carmen Jacob’s Photography Mittens, which are also made using the waistcoat stitch. What’s cool about her pattern is that it includes little slits for your thumb and index finger to sneak out of the mitten to operate a camera. Def check out the free pattern if, like me, you’re often taking photos outside in the dead of winter!

This is crochet?! This free crochet mitten pattern uses the waistcoat stitch (aka the center single crochet stitch) to create a classic knit look. And the Lion Brand Fishermen's Wool makes them naturally water resistant! Get the free Morning Mittens pattern from Make & Do Crew.

Lion Brand Fisherman’s Wool proved to be the perfect fiber to whip up some knit-looking crochet mittens because as 100% wool, it’s super warm and cozy for cold winter days and it’s naturally water resistant. The wool fiber really conjures that classic mitten vibe and I’m guessing our great grandmothers might have been making similar mittens for their families a century ago. Fisherman’s Wool comes with a hefty 8 oz (465 yards) of yarn as well, so you’ll even have some yarn left over to start another pair. Wouldn’t these make perfect crochet stocking stuffers for friends and family?

UPDATE: Lion Brand has created a kit that includes the yarn you’ll need to make these knit-looking mittens, plus a printed copy of the pattern. What a fun package to receive in the mail! Grab your Morning Mittens kit here.

(An important note about washing 100% wool–it can shrink! Just like any other wool garment, these crochet mittens will shrink if washed on hot. I suggest hand washing them on cold and then laying them flat to dry so you don’t end up with any mini munchkin mittens.) 

Speaking of handmade gifts, I’ve included a few other free Make & Do Crew crochet patterns below that would make great DIY presents for someone special in your life. Scroll down for the Morning free crochet mittens pattern!

Free modern crochet patterns from Make & Do Crew including the Sierra Slippers, The Revival Scarf and Sunday Slippers.

1. Sierra Slippers   2. The Revival Scarf 3. Sunday Slippers

Do not re-publish this pattern as your own. You may make items to sell with this pattern. In exchange, please link back to this post. Do NOT use my photos as your own sales photos. ­­You can read my policies hereNow let’s make something awesome!

Morning Mittens
Free Crochet Mittens Pattern

Purchase the ad-free, printable PDF here.

Add this pattern to your Ravelry favorites here.

Pin it for later here.

Explanation:
Inspired by wool mittens of yesteryear, the Morning crochet mittens may look knit, but they’re actually crochet! The simple single crochet waistcoat crochet stitch creates a beautifully classic knit-like texture, while the 100% wool yarn means your mittens are also naturally water resistant. (Not a fan of wool? Substitute your favorite worsted weight alternative!) By holding two strands of yarn together, these mittens make for super speedy handmade gifts. Personalize with buttons, leather or even dye!

Supplies:
So you can spend more time making mittens and less time shopping, this pattern contains affiliate links at no extra cost to you.
Purchase a kit with the yarn needed, plus a printed copy of the pattern here.
• Lion Brand Fishermen’s Wool (Weight: 4/medium – 465 yds, 8 oz)
– Color: Natural (#098)  1 skein (approx. 140 total g divided into two equal balls)
• Tapestry needle
• Size K (6.5 mm) crochet hook (to make smaller size)
• Size L (8 mm) crochet hook (to make both sizes)
• Size N (10 mm) crochet hook (to make larger size)
Stitch markers or safety pins
Leather scraps (optional)
Rotary cutter and mat or sharp scissors (optional)
• Embroidery floss (optional)
Hole punch, leather punch or hammer and nail (optional)

Abbreviations (US Terms):
ch – chain
sc – single crochet
hdc – half double crochet
hdcblo – half double crochet through the back loop only
st(s) – stitch(es)
sl st – slip stitch
yo – yarn over
post – the vertical strands of yarn in a sc stich (see photos below in “mitten hand” section)
RS – right side
WS – wrong side

Sizing:
Pattern is identical for S and M/L. Sizing is based on hook size used.

Small: appropriate for younger teens or women with smaller hands (approx. 7” tall not including cuff and 8.25” around at widest point)

Medium/Large: appropriate for most women (approx. 8” tall not including cuff and 8.75” around at widest point)

Gauge:
as measured on hand portion

Size S: 5.5 sc x 6.5 rows = 2”

Size M/L: 5 sc x 6 rows = 2”

Overall Pattern Notes:
• The pattern is written for one size. Follow notes within for appropriate hook size to make either S or M/L mittens.

• Entire pattern is worked with two strands of yarn held together. Either work with outer strand and inner strand of skein or remove a “baby skein” from the inside of the larger skein and cut to create two separate balls.

• Learn how to dye your completed crochet mittens with food coloring in this video tutorial.

• Watch this video tutorial to learn essential tips on successfully working the waistcoat stitch used in this mitten pattern.

MITTEN CUFF

Notes:
• The right and left cuffs are worked identically.

• Row 2 and beyond are worked into the back loop of the hdc stitch only (hdcblo).

• Ch 2 at beginning of each round does not count as a st.

Size small: Use size K hook.

Size medium/large: Use size L hook.

Make 2.

Foundation: Ch 17.

Row 1 (RS): Hdc in third ch, hdc in each hdc; turn. (15)

Rows 2 – 12: Ch 2, hdcblo in each hdc; turn. (15)

Fasten off, leaving 15” tail to seam cuff.

SEAMING CUFF

With RS facing out, pin cuff into a loop by placing the initial chain row underneath Row 12. Using both strands of the cuff tail and a tapestry needle, work a basting stitch to join edges. Take care to create enough overlap that foundation chain doesn’t stretch and create large gaps. (See photos below.)

Turn cuff inside out to proceed with mitten hand.

How to crochet ribbing using half double crochet. Use it in this free crochet mittens pattern.

MITTEN HAND

Notes:
• Follow notes throughout on how to work right and left hands. Where not noted, right and left hands are worked identically. 

• Hands are crocheted in the round with each row beginning with a ch 1 and ending with a sl st to the first sc of round. Neither the ch 1 or sl st count as sts.

• Row 2 and beyond are worked into the middle of each sc stitch rather than the top loops. See photo below for hook placement. Besides inserting your hook in a slightly different location, you will still be working regular sc stitches.

• Take care to keep stitches loose so that it’s easier to insert hook on the next round. As you work each sc, it’s helpful to raise your hook a bit after picking up your second loop so as to ensure the two posts remain loose enough for next round. (See photos below.)

How to work the crochet waistcoat stitch in the round to make crochet that looks like knitting!How to crochet the waistcoat stitch by working in the round in this free crochet mitten pattern. This center single crochet stitch looks like like knitting!

Size small: Use size L hook.

Size medium/large: Use size N hook.

RIGHT & LEFT MITTENS: attaching yarn

With WS of cuff seam facing you, attach yarn anywhere along either edge of cuff.

RIGHT & LEFT MITTENS: increasing for thumb

Round 1: Ch 1, work 14 sc evenly around, sl st to first sc to join. (14)

Round 2: Ch 1, sc in next 6, 2 sc in each of next 2 sc, sc in next 6 sc, sl st to join. (16)

Round 3: Ch 1, sc in next 7, 2 sc in each of next 2 sc, sc in next 7 sc, sl st to join. (18)

Round 4: Ch 1, sc in next 8, 2 sc in each of next 2 sc, sc in next 8 sc, sl st to join. (20)

Rounds 5-6: Ch 1, sc in each sc, sl st to join. (20)

RIGHT mitten: creating thumb hole & hand

Round 7: Ch 1, sc in each of next 10 sc, sk 4 sc, loosely ch 3, sc in each of next 6 sc, sl st to join. (19)

Round 8: Ch 1, sc in each sc and ch, sl st to join. (19)

Weave in any remaining ends now as it will become difficult to do so later.

Rounds 9-19: Ch 1, sc in each sc, sl st to join. (19)

Round 20: Ch 1, sc in each of next 8 sc, sc2tog, sc in each of next 7, sc2tog, sl st to join. (17)

See photo below for where to work into decrease sts.

Round 21: Ch 1, sc in each of next 7 sc, sc2tog, sc in each of next 6, sc2tog, sl st to join. (15)

Round 22: Ch 1, sc in each of next 6 sc, sc2tog, sc in each of next 5, sc2tog, sl st to join. (13)

Round 23: Ch 1, sc in each of next 5 sc, sc2tog, sc in each of next 4, sc2tog, sl st to join. (11)

Proceed to instructions for closing the top.

LEFT mitten: creating thumb hole & hand

Round 7: Ch 1, sc in each of next 6 sc, sk 4 sc, loosely ch 3, sc in each of next 10 sc, sl st to join. (19)

Round 8: Ch 1, sc in each sc and ch, sl st to join. (19)

Weave in any remaining ends now as it will become difficult to do so later.

Rounds 9-19: Ch 1, sc in each sc, sl st to join. (19)

See photo above  for how to decrease (sc2tog) while working between posts of each sc stitch.

Round 20: Ch 1, sc in each of next 7 sc, sc2tog, sc in each of next 8, sc2tog, sl st to join. (17)

Round 21: Ch 1, sc in each of next 6 sc, sc2tog, sc in each of next 7, sc2tog, sl st to join. (15)

Round 22: Ch 1, sc in each of next 5 sc, sc2tog, sc in each of next 6, sc2tog, sl st to join. (13)

Round 23: Ch 1, sc in each of next 4 sc, sc2tog, sc in each of next 5, sc2tog, sl st to join. (11)

Proceed to instructions for closing the top.

RIGHT & LEFT mittens: closing top

Fasten off, leaving 15” tail to close top.

Mitten top is closed using a technique commonly used in amigurimi where tapestry needle is worked through only the front loops of each single crochet stitch.

Thread both strands of tail from mitten top onto tapestry needle. Insert needle from inside of mitten, under front loop of first sc, out toward you. Repeat each each sc around taking care to always work from inside mitten to out. Do not tighten down as you go.

Once you return back to first sc stitch, gently cinch circle together until it closes. Use tapestry needle to weave in remaining tail. This is a helpful tutorial with more details on this technique.

How to close amigurumi in the round by working into the front loops only. Use it in to close this free crochet mittens pattern.

THUMB

Notes:
• See photo below for visual explanation of thumb.

• As in the mitten hand, all sc stitches are worked between posts of sc from previous round.

RIGHT & LEFT mittens: creating thumb

Right-handed crocheters: Attach yarn at right “corner” of thumb where Rounds 6 and 7 meet. Work clockwise.

Left-handed crocheters: Attach yarn at left “corner” of thumb where Rounds 6 and 7 meet. Work counterclockwise.

How to crochet mittens--free pattern and tutorial by Make & Do Crew.

Round 1: Ch 1, sc in each of next 4 sc, sl st to “corner” between Rounds 6 and 7, sc in each of next 3, sl st to opposite “corner” between Rounds 6 and 7, sl st to join. (7) 

Round 2: Ch 1, sc in each sc (do not work into sl sts), sl st to join. (7)

Rounds 3-8: Ch 1, sc in each sc, sl st to join. (7)

Fasten off leaving 12” tail.

RIGHT & LEFT mittens: closing thumb
Work as described for mitten top.

LEATHER ACCENTS

To add optional leather accents, use a rotary cutter or scissors to create two .5” x 4” strips of leather. (Try a thrifted leather jacket, purse or wallet!)

How to add leather accents on crochet projects, including these crochet wool mittens.How to add leather accents on crochet projects, including these crochet wool mittens.

Punch four holes in each corner of leather strips using either 1/8-1/16th inch hole punch, leather punch or nail and hammer. 

Fasten leather to mitten cuffs using embroidery thread.  

Brew some coffee, pull on your new Morning Mittens and head outside to catch the sunrise!

Please Note: 100% wool yarn can shrink if washed incorrectly. Keep your new mitts from becoming minis by washing with cold water and laying flat to dry. You can learn how to dip dye your completed mittens with food coloring here!

Here are some other free crochet patterns and tutorials from Make & Do Crew you might like to make next!

Free modern crochet patterns from Make and Do Crew including the Desert Winds Triangle Scarf, Cabin Boots with flip flop soles and a bun beanie pattern.

1. 25 Crochet Stitch Tutorials Perfect for Afghans

2. Desert Winds Triangle Scarf – one skein project!

3. Faux Cabled Bun Beanie – free pattern and video tutorial!

4. Cabin Boots made with flip flop soles – free pattern and video tutorial!

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26 Comments

  • Susan
    October 22, 2017 at 7:48 pm

    Hi Jess!
    What an Awesome Pattern for mittens!
    I can’t wait to try your neat way to create a crocheted “knit-look” stitch!
    Thank You So Much for sharing Your Inspiring Creativity!
    Most Grateful!

    Reply
  • Judy
    October 23, 2017 at 8:21 am

    I have never had any interest in crocheting mittens–until now. Never wanted to figure out the thumb hole or how to sew to finish off, but your instructions are so clear that I think I’ll have to try this technique. Thank you so much for sharing the pattern.

    Reply
  • Deborah
    October 24, 2017 at 11:30 am

    You asked for other ways to make crochet look like knitting. My favorite is Tunisian crochet. The Tunisian stitch named Tunisian knit stitch looks exactly like knitting. So much so that items have been disqualified from crochet contests because the judges thought they were knitted. I love Tunisian crochet and I can do anything, including cables, that knitters do, with my Tunisian hook.

    Reply
  • Georg-Anne
    October 29, 2017 at 10:51 am

    Scored a brand new golden brown XL leather jacket at Goodwill for 7.50! Perfect for soles and accents! Thank you for the idea!

    Reply
    • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
      November 2, 2017 at 11:43 pm

      Yay! Congrats! I love when I find treasures like that. 🙂

      Reply
    • Deanne
      September 9, 2019 at 9:56 am

      Hi Jess
      Your mittens look wonderful. I have just the wool yarn in my stash to make these with. After watching your video on dyeing them with food dye, a question came to mind. How do you keep the mittens from shrinking during the dye process?

      Reply
  • Katie
    November 5, 2017 at 6:53 am

    How would you size these up for a man? Would you use a bigger hook on the mitten part or add another row of increase for the thumb and another row for the mitten?

    Reply
    • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
      November 8, 2017 at 10:36 am

      Great question. I do think you could just either:
      a. use a bigger hook
      b. add a couple rows to the cuff and then work an additional 2-3 stitches into the first round where you’re working into the cuff. You may find that you need to add an extra ch for the thumb hole too.

      Happy crocheting!

      Jess

      Reply
  • Sierra
    November 27, 2017 at 7:45 pm

    Jess, this pattern is great! I’ve always been a little hesitant of crochet mittens, but these are perfect. The waistcoat stitch is nice and tight so you don’t have holes!
    Thanks for mentioning my tutorial too.
    Stay cozy,
    Sierra

    Reply
  • Phyllis
    December 4, 2017 at 8:46 am

    Hi, this is such a nice pattern and really easy to understand thank you

    Reply
  • Cindy
    December 5, 2017 at 3:17 pm

    Hi! When you say use two strands, is that only is you substitute the wool yarn for Lion Brand Vanna yarn? Or use two strands for this pattern regardless of yarn?
    Thanks so much for any guidance!

    Reply
    • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
      December 6, 2017 at 3:35 pm

      Hey Cindy,

      The two strands is if you’re using Fisherman’s Wool. If you use a different yarn, I’d do a gauge swatch to see how your yarn compares to the yarn used in the pattern. If you use a diff worsted weight yarn, you’ll probably want two strands held together. 🙂

      Jess

      Reply
  • cindy
    December 8, 2017 at 6:51 pm

    as i was making these mittens i didn’t like the seam that was up the side of the mittens so i made them without the slip stitch and the ch 1. turned out amazing thank you so much for sharing your pattern. i will be making lots more of these.

    Reply
    • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
      December 11, 2017 at 10:02 pm

      I’m so happy to hear you found a way that worked for you. Thanks for sharing your experience with everyone else. I’m sure it’ll be helpful. 🙂

      Jess

      Reply
    • Treba
      February 27, 2018 at 8:16 pm

      Hi Cindy, when you crocheted the knit look mittens. Did your stitches slant ? I want to be able to keep the stitches straight. I really want to be able to crochet this stitch in the round. Thank you

      Reply
  • Susie
    December 13, 2017 at 3:42 pm

    Hi Jess,
    These mittens caught my eye immediately. You’ve created another amazing pattern. My first attempt at using the waistcoat stitch went well, but I think I made a few other errors.
    ~When you slipstitch to join the rounds, are you slipstitching into the first single crochet?
    ~Is the first single crochet made in the same space as the chain?
    Thank you for your help and the lovely pattern.
    Susie

    Reply
  • Andrea
    December 24, 2017 at 7:13 am

    This is amazing!
    I made them for my 5 year old daughter. I just used one strand of worsted weight yarn instead of 2 and a G hook. They turned out perfectly.

    Reply
    • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
      December 24, 2017 at 2:44 pm

      Oh that’s awesome to know! Thank you for sharing those details. I have a 5-yr-old too and I’m sure she’d love a pair!

      Jess

      Reply
  • Rebecca
    January 24, 2018 at 7:10 pm

    Does the pattern or hook size change if you use a thicker yarn? I finished the right mitt and it’s HUGE and I even omitted ~7 rows. Help!

    Reply
    • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
      February 5, 2018 at 10:19 pm

      Yes, it’ll def change if you use a thicker yarn. The gauge listed in the pattern assumes using two strands of worsted weight held together. If you’re not achieving the same gauge listed above then you mittens will be different than the measurements listed.

      Reply
  • Irene Malecki
    January 25, 2018 at 2:12 pm

    Why do your mittens look so bulky the Fishermans wool I have doesn’t apperar as thick as yours

    Reply
  • Treba
    February 27, 2018 at 7:58 pm

    This stitch is so pretty, its my favorite. But, I dont understand how to join in the round and keep it straight, mine goes in a slant. Can you please explain how to keep it straight? Thank you.

    Reply
    • Jess @ Make and Do Crew
      February 28, 2018 at 3:07 pm

      Hey Treba,

      Mine slants a bit too. Since I was using wool, I found that if I spritzed it with water and then just squished it in the opposite direction, it basically straightened out. I think that slanting is a bit par for the course with this stitch, but I’ll def update the post with additional tips if I learn how to avoid that. 🙂

      Jess

      Reply
  • Lori
    September 20, 2018 at 8:26 pm

    Hi Jess,

    Do you by any chance have a video for these mittens? I’m still fairly new to crocheting and have never figured out how to make a nice mitten. These are the nicest I’ve come across.

    Reply

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